Baba Ali Research (Book Secrets): Coal vs. Oil in a #Steampunk World

Notes from my time writing “Baba Ali and the Clockwork Djinn” and fun tidbits

Middle East Steampunk does not run on coal.

Coal-powered steampunk is something that I think (opinion here) would exist in Western countries where coal is more prevalent.  Granted, Persia at the time of our book would (and does) have massive coal reserves, but that isn’t the way the society and culture developed.  Not…

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Baba Ali Research (Book Secrets): Himitsu-Bako

Notes from my time writing “Baba Ali and the Clockwork Djinn” and fun tidbits.

Puzzles, puzzles, and more puzzles.

Baba Ali receives a puzzle box from a mysterious mechanical falcon.I’ve read about puzzle boxes and secret boxes and this sounded like something great to include. However, the only one I’ve seen was “Lemarchand’s Box” from the Hellraiser movies. Yeah, not going to use that as a…

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independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” by Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the…

dcwomenkickingass:

Happy 4th of July America with Wonder Woman, a Feminist
Equality is a core, fundamental belief at the heart of the Declaration of Independence which was signed 228 years ago today. Yet equality seems to be a court ruling away for anyone who does not resemble those that signed out - white men.
This week saw the United States Supreme Court open the flood gates to vague religious “objections” trumping the rights of women who need perscribed drugs. 
Ruth Bader Ginsberg wrote that ”The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield” due to the Hobby Lobby ruling.
She’s right. And that minefield will be filled with bloodied dead rights of women. And now we have seen this ruling quickly being used to enable employers to deny gays employment.
Which is why I love this portrait of Wonder Woman flying over the United States Capital. I can imagine that she’s flying to have a word with the non-female court justices who voted for the small-minded hypocrites of the Hobby Lobby. 
Of course, this won’t really happen.
Wonder Woman is, we know, a fictional creation. She and her likeness is owned by a large multinational corporation who can choose to do with her what they wish.
But you can’t have things both ways.
Wonder Woman is not just a “superhero” in the same way that Batman and Superman are. She is more than that and they know it. Her likeness is sold to hundreds of companies around the world to be emblazoned onto merchandise targeted and sold to women and girls bringing in invisible planes full of cash.
The reason they can do this and do do this is because Wonder Woman is viewed as a sign of female empowerment and equality. 
She is a symbol that says women are equal to men. 
She says that women can do what men can do.
She doesn’t Lean In, she breaks the door down and cracks the ceiling.
She is a feminist.
Denying this denies the DNA of the character.
Side-stepping this or attempting to not say “Feminist” communicates a lack of understanding of the character and suggest some concerning issues around a view of women.
This is not about one writer not saying one thing.
This is a larger issue of seeing the connection of feminism with Wonder Woman as a problem.
By not using and avoiding the word it supports the demonization of the word. It helps give life to the concept of things like “Femi-Nazi”
And people who own the character and reap the rewards of marketing that character as an embodiment of female power and equality of should realize the hypocrisy of this.
I don’t want to hear about a Wonder Woman is strong and beautiful and wise and loving and fierce without hearing the word feminist too.
I’ve heard and read some horrible things about women and the concept of feminism over the last few days both on my blog and on other sites. Not only about Wonder Woman issue but the Supreme Court’s ruling as well. 
What better way to communicate the positive aspects of feminism than to reinforce that the pop culture symbol of female empowerment is a feminist by having the executives of the company who own her simply state it.
I’ll be here waiting.

via
Portrait of Wonder Woman by Steve Rude

A bit late for 4th of July but I love this too much and it is too important not to reblog! 
Well said!

dcwomenkickingass:

Happy 4th of July America with Wonder Woman, a Feminist

Equality is a core, fundamental belief at the heart of the Declaration of Independence which was signed 228 years ago today. Yet equality seems to be a court ruling away for anyone who does not resemble those that signed out - white men.

This week saw the United States Supreme Court open the flood gates to vague religious “objections” trumping the rights of women who need perscribed drugs. 

Ruth Bader Ginsberg wrote that ”The court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield” due to the Hobby Lobby ruling.

She’s right. And that minefield will be filled with bloodied dead rights of women. And now we have seen this ruling quickly being used to enable employers to deny gays employment.

Which is why I love this portrait of Wonder Woman flying over the United States Capital. I can imagine that she’s flying to have a word with the non-female court justices who voted for the small-minded hypocrites of the Hobby Lobby. 

Of course, this won’t really happen.

Wonder Woman is, we know, a fictional creation. She and her likeness is owned by a large multinational corporation who can choose to do with her what they wish.

But you can’t have things both ways.

Wonder Woman is not just a “superhero” in the same way that Batman and Superman are. She is more than that and they know it. Her likeness is sold to hundreds of companies around the world to be emblazoned onto merchandise targeted and sold to women and girls bringing in invisible planes full of cash.

The reason they can do this and do do this is because Wonder Woman is viewed as a sign of female empowerment and equality. 

She is a symbol that says women are equal to men. 

She says that women can do what men can do.

She doesn’t Lean In, she breaks the door down and cracks the ceiling.

She is a feminist.

Denying this denies the DNA of the character.

Side-stepping this or attempting to not say “Feminist” communicates a lack of understanding of the character and suggest some concerning issues around a view of women.

This is not about one writer not saying one thing.

This is a larger issue of seeing the connection of feminism with Wonder Woman as a problem.

By not using and avoiding the word it supports the demonization of the word. It helps give life to the concept of things like “Femi-Nazi”

And people who own the character and reap the rewards of marketing that character as an embodiment of female power and equality of should realize the hypocrisy of this.

I don’t want to hear about a Wonder Woman is strong and beautiful and wise and loving and fierce without hearing the word feminist too.

I’ve heard and read some horrible things about women and the concept of feminism over the last few days both on my blog and on other sites. Not only about Wonder Woman issue but the Supreme Court’s ruling as well. 

What better way to communicate the positive aspects of feminism than to reinforce that the pop culture symbol of female empowerment is a feminist by having the executives of the company who own her simply state it.

I’ll be here waiting.

via

Portrait of Wonder Woman by Steve Rude


A bit late for 4th of July but I love this too much and it is too important not to reblog! 

Well said!

dcwomenkickingass:

talesyoulose:

Gotham Chicks

DC Women are Money, baby!

Tags: comics art

diversityinya:

By Livia Blackburne

image

Flashback 1: I finish outlining my new WIP and realize it’s the most Chinese story I’ve written to date, though it doesn’t contain any Chinese characters.

Flashback 2: In my predominantly white/Hispanic middle school, we watch Disney’s The Little Mermaid and…

diversityinya:

By Malinda Lo

In 2012, I was invited by NPR to review an about-to-be-published young adult novel titled The Miseducation of Cameron Post by debut authoremily m. danforth. I was a little nervous about it because I don’t like to criticize about my colleagues’ novels in public. But I didn’t need to worry — Cameron Post blew me away. It was the coming-of-age, coming-out novel that spoke to me in in such a deeply personal way that it felt like it was written for me.

Maybe that’s why I was so ticked off to hear thatCameron Post was recently removed from a summer reading list in Delaware due to parental complaints about its explicit language. Cameron Post is a complex, multilayered, award-winning novel that cannot by any means be reduced down to the number of times the word fuck in used in its 470 pages. And yet that is what has happened.

[Continue reading the full story at Diversity in YA]

(via bluestockingbookworm)

goddessofsax:

Here’s a handy dandy color reference chart for you artists, writers, or any one else who needs it! Inspired by this post x

(via seananmcguire)

Tags: colors

Painter painting in our land pictures of only white angels
Painter painting in our time in shadows of yesterday

Painter, if you paint with love, paint me some black angels now
For all good blacks in heaven, painter show us that you care

Eartha Kitt - Angelitos Negros (1970 performance)

(Source: foxwin, via kellysue)

Be Careful What You Label a Failure in your Life - Paul Williams (#quote)

Be Careful What You Label a Failure in your Life – Paul Williams (#quote)

Phantom of the Paradise Poster“I did things in my 30s that were ignored by the world, that could have been quickly labeled a failure. Here’s a classic example; in 1974 I did a movie called Phantom of the Paradise. Phantom of the Paradise, which was a huge flop in this country. There were only two cities in the world where it had any real success: Winnipeg, in Canada, and Paris, France. So, okay, let’s write it off as a…

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