What books have stayed with you? My list.

What books have stayed with you? My list.

These Books Are Hot
For a while the question of “What books have stayed with you?” was floating around on Facebook. Many of my both reader and writer friends indulged and it was fascinating to see what books from both childhood and adulthood resonated with them.  We all have those books we read that stick with us.  They aren’t necessarily our favorites; some of them we may not even like, but there was something in…

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thecivilwarparlor
thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater

In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.
Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.


Original Author: Unknown
Created: May 3, 1887
Medium: Photographic print
Virginia Historical Society

thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater

In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.

Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: May 3, 1887

Medium: Photographic print

Virginia Historical Society

tangledaxon
tangledaxon:

blessedharlot:

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of  Ascension by Jacqueline Koyanagi. The cover features a black woman in front of a space ship background. She is wearing futuristic armor and carrying a large gun. The blurb on the cover is “Meet Alana Quick: Mechanic. Stowaway. Hero.”]
blessedharlot:

Oohhhhhhh y’all. Y’all y’all y’all. A heroine that’s Black, and loves women. And has a disability.
In a sci-fi westernish pulpy kinda story.
I’m sixty pages in, and it’s kinda hard to put down.
Front blurb: Meet Alana Quick: Mechanic. Stowaway. Hero.
Back blurb: “There are badass women running around doing badass things and falling in love with each other and with starships, and I’m totally down with that.” - Kameron Hurley, author of God’s War
This is the only title I can find from this author, but as you can see, it’s listed as being part of a series. There may be even more to come!


Reblogging for description - thank you, I posted the original quickly and wasn’t thinking - and to say that the book is wonderful and I can’t wait for the sequel.

Hooray, I’m glad you liked it!

tangledaxon:

blessedharlot:

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of  Ascension by Jacqueline Koyanagi. The cover features a black woman in front of a space ship background. She is wearing futuristic armor and carrying a large gun. The blurb on the cover is “Meet Alana Quick: Mechanic. Stowaway. Hero.”]

blessedharlot:

Oohhhhhhh y’all. Y’all y’all y’all. A heroine that’s Black, and loves women. And has a disability.

In a sci-fi westernish pulpy kinda story.

I’m sixty pages in, and it’s kinda hard to put down.

Front blurb: Meet Alana Quick: Mechanic. Stowaway. Hero.

Back blurb: “There are badass women running around doing badass things and falling in love with each other and with starships, and I’m totally down with that.” - Kameron Hurley, author of God’s War

This is the only title I can find from this author, but as you can see, it’s listed as being part of a series. There may be even more to come!

Reblogging for description - thank you, I posted the original quickly and wasn’t thinking - and to say that the book is wonderful and I can’t wait for the sequel.

Hooray, I’m glad you liked it!

jhameia

It’s a lie we tell ourselves because we have learned to mask our fears. We have learned that strong women know their own worth and don’t need validation from others. But there is a deeper truth behind that story; and that is we often do want the validation. We want to be recognized. We want to be acknowledged and we want to be chosen. We want to be good enough to love. But we can’t say that. We don’t want to look like we care that much. We don’t want to appear weak or needy, because being weak is for losers. We want to win. And when we do, we want to accept our prize showing the world that we were always confident in our ability to have it. Now, that is not to say that every good thing we do for ourselves is to get love and approval from men or from anyone else, for that matter. What I am saying is that if we are honest, we would admit that a lot of what we do actually is.

Although there are many who would proudly proclaim that they don’t need or even want the validation, there is still that quiet whisper of those who are not quite so convinced. And they are ashamed; ashamed of their desire to be loved or of their fear of not being good enough. So, let’s start having more real conversations-not just the ones where we tell one another how great and powerful and worthy we are. While we are all of those things, there are times when we are also afraid and unsure and vulnerable. And it is during these times that we should be able to simply say, without judgment, “Sometimes, I feel like I’m just not good enough.” We don’t need to hear how smart or pretty or talented we are and we don’t need to hear what we could do to make ourselves better. We only need to hear, “I know how that feels.”

gimpnelly

gimpnelly:

Last week I wrote this piece for Comic Book Resources about the new Teen Titans #1 cover. The point of the piece was hey, there’s a broad demographic DC *could* be hitting with this book but the cover is certainly not made for that potential demographic. Instead, it’s more of the same-old,…