princelesscomic:

ICYMI: Here’s me on the internet radio talking about Illegal, Princeless, misrepresentation and under representation in the media, and diversity in comics and other media - a thing which, if you didn’t know, I maintain is important.

amandaonwriting:



100 Beautiful and Ugly Words
by Mark Nichol
One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses
Beautiful Words
Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
Beguile: deceive
Caprice: impulse
Cascade: steep waterfall
Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
Chrysalis: protective covering
Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
Coalesce: unite, or fuse
Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
Diaphanous: gauzy
Dulcet: sweet
Ebullient: enthusiastic
Effervescent: bubbly
Elision: omission
Enchanted: charmed
Encompass: surround
Enrapture: delighted
Ephemeral: fleeting
Epiphany: revelation
Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
Etiquette: proper conduct
Evanescent: fleeting
Evocative: suggestive
Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
Filament: thread, strand
Halcyon: care-free
Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
Incorporeal: without form
Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
Inexorable: relentless
Insouciance: nonchalance
Iridescent: luster
Languid: slow, listless
Lassitude: fatigue
Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
Lithe: flexible, graceful
Lullaby: soothing song
Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
Murmur: soothing sound
Myriad: great number
Nebulous: indistinct
Opulent: ostentatious
Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
Plethora: abundance
Quiescent: peaceful
Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
Radiant: glowing
Redolent: aromatic, evocative
Resonant: echoing, evocative
Resplendent: shining
Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
Scintilla: trace
Serendipitous: chance
Serene: peaceful
Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
Spherical: ball-like, globular
Sublime: exalted, transcendent
Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
Suffuse: flushed, full
Susurration: whispering
Symphony: harmonious assemblage
Talisman: charm, magical device
Tessellated: checkered in pattern
Tranquility: peacefulness
Vestige: trace
Zenith: highest point
Ugly Words
Cacophony: confused noise
Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
Chafe: irritate, abrade
Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
Disgust: aversion, distaste
Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
Harangue: rant
Hirsute: hairy
Hoarse: harsh, grating
Leech: parasite,
Maladroit: clumsy
Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
Rancid: offensive, smelly
Repugnant: distasteful
Repulsive: disgusting
Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
Shrill: high-pitched sound
Shun: avoid, ostracize
Slaughter: butcher, carnage
Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic
Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?
By Mark Nichol
Source for Article 
Source for Image

amandaonwriting:

100 Beautiful and Ugly Words

by Mark Nichol

One of the many fascinating features of our language is how often words with pleasant associations are also quite pleasing on the tongue and even to the eye, and how many words, by contrast, acoustically and visually corroborate their disagreeable nature — look no further than the heading for this post.
Enrich the poetry of your prose by applying words that provide precise connotation while also evoking emotional responses

Beautiful Words

  • Amorphous: indefinite, shapeless
  • Beguile: deceive
  • Caprice: impulse
  • Cascade: steep waterfall
  • Cashmere: fine, delicate wool
  • Chrysalis: protective covering
  • Cinnamon: an aromatic spice; its soft brown color
  • Coalesce: unite, or fuse
  • Crepuscular: dim, or twilit
  • Crystalline: clear, or sparkling
  • Desultory: half-hearted, meandering
  • Diaphanous: gauzy
  • Dulcet: sweet
  • Ebullient: enthusiastic
  • Effervescent: bubbly
  • Elision: omission
  • Enchanted: charmed
  • Encompass: surround
  • Enrapture: delighted
  • Ephemeral: fleeting
  • Epiphany: revelation
  • Epitome: embodiment of the ideal
  • Ethereal: celestial, unworldly, immaterial
  • Etiquette: proper conduct
  • Evanescent: fleeting
  • Evocative: suggestive
  • Exuberant: abundant, unrestrained, outsize
  • Felicity: happiness, pleasantness
  • Filament: thread, strand
  • Halcyon: care-free
  • Idyllic: contentedly pleasing
  • Incorporeal: without form
  • Incandescent: glowing, radiant, brilliant, zealous
  • Ineffable: indescribable, unspeakable
  • Inexorable: relentless
  • Insouciance: nonchalance
  • Iridescent: luster
  • Languid: slow, listless
  • Lassitude: fatigue
  • Lilt: cheerful or buoyant song or movement
  • Lithe: flexible, graceful
  • Lullaby: soothing song
  • Luminescence: dim chemical or organic light
  • Mellifluous: smooth, sweet
  • Mist: cloudy moisture, or similar literal or virtual obstacle
  • Murmur: soothing sound
  • Myriad: great number
  • Nebulous: indistinct
  • Opulent: ostentatious
  • Penumbra: shade, shroud, fringe
  • Plethora: abundance
  • Quiescent: peaceful
  • Quintessential: most purely representative or typical
  • Radiant: glowing
  • Redolent: aromatic, evocative
  • Resonant: echoing, evocative
  • Resplendent: shining
  • Rhapsodic: intensely emotional
  • Sapphire: rich, deep bluish purple
  • Scintilla: trace
  • Serendipitous: chance
  • Serene: peaceful
  • Somnolent: drowsy, sleep inducing
  • Sonorous: loud, impressive, imposing
  • Spherical: ball-like, globular
  • Sublime: exalted, transcendent
  • Succulent: juicy, tasty, rich
  • Suffuse: flushed, full
  • Susurration: whispering
  • Symphony: harmonious assemblage
  • Talisman: charm, magical device
  • Tessellated: checkered in pattern
  • Tranquility: peacefulness
  • Vestige: trace
  • Zenith: highest point

Ugly Words

  • Cacophony: confused noise
  • Cataclysm: flood, catastrophe, upheaval
  • Chafe: irritate, abrade
  • Coarse: common, crude, rough, harsh
  • Cynical: distrustful, self-interested
  • Decrepit: worn-out, run-down
  • Disgust: aversion, distaste
  • Grimace: expression of disgust or pain
  • Grotesque: distorted, bizarre
  • Harangue: rant
  • Hirsute: hairy
  • Hoarse: harsh, grating
  • Leech: parasite,
  • Maladroit: clumsy
  • Mediocre: ordinary, of low quality
  • Obstreperous: noisy, unruly
  • Rancid: offensive, smelly
  • Repugnant: distasteful
  • Repulsive: disgusting
  • Shriek: sharp, screeching sound
  • Shrill: high-pitched sound
  • Shun: avoid, ostracize
  • Slaughter: butcher, carnage
  • Unctuous: smug, ingratiating
  • Visceral: crude, anatomically graphic

Notice how often attractive words present themselves to define other beautiful ones, and note also how many of them are interrelated, and what kind of sensations, impressions, and emotions they have in common. Also, try enunciating beautiful words as if they were ugly, or vice versa. Are their sounds suggestive of their quality, or does their meaning wholly determine their effect on us?

By Mark Nichol

Source for Article 

Source for Image

(via bluestockingbookworm)

books-cupcakes:

Book Photo Challenge hosted by : Books & Cupcakes

Month: AugustIf you have any questions about the challenge please check the FAQ! Thank you and happy reading!! xoxo Jessica from Books and Cupcakes

books-cupcakes:

Book Photo Challenge hosted by : Books & Cupcakes

Month: August
If you have any questions about the challenge please check the FAQ! Thank you and happy reading!! 
xoxo Jessica from Books and Cupcakes

Response from the #Disability Community and Statement of Solidarity on Events in #Ferguson.

leadonupdate:

Dear Friends

The recent events in Ferguson and the nationwide vigils have cause a significant amount of reflection and thought for us here at the Lead on Network. It has been difficult over the past few days the view the events that have taken place and not thought about our own advocacy missions, as well as the personal freedoms that have allowed us to participate in the advocacy for individuals with disabilities. Though the events in Ferguson have been couched in the terms of class and race, it is hard to ignore the similarities between the treatment of our marginalized communities as well as the harsh reaction against the activist community attempting to draw attention to this complicated issue.

In addition to the complicated issues of race and class, we have also been disappointed that very few (if any) members of our community have spoken up in reference to the Ferguson events about the importance of protecting free speech, the need for the rights of a protest and advocacy community to be protected, or even our own history of excessive force at the hands of some members of law enforcement.

We have consistently flown the banner quoting Martin Luther King’s assertion that Injustice anywhere is a threat to Justice Everywhere, and because of that assertion and core value we cannot remain silent on the events of Ferguson. As members of a community whose values are inclusion and access we must be willing to defend those values when they are denied to other communities in addition to our own. This engagement and solidarity is in keeping with the final call to action from Justin Dart and is the core of the best parts of the human condition.

Because of this, the Lead On Network is issuing a call for solidarity with the Community of Ferguson, Missouri. This statement is not aimed at placing blame, rather it is a call for us to take the collective responsibility for all of our communities and work with as many stakeholders as necessary to keep the events from the past week from repeating.

As allies in the universal struggle for justice and inclusion, we hope that you and your organizations consider signing this Call to Solidarity with us.

Warmest Regards,
The Lead On Network

A Call for Solidarity with the Community of Ferguson, Missouri
August 15, 2014

For the last few days, like many other disenfranchised communities across the country, the disability community has watched what is happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Our hearts are heavy with sorrow, anger, and fear for what is happening to individuals, families, and communities so similar to our own.

Even following the release of the name of the police officer who was ultimately responsible for Michael Brown’s death, we must still come to terms with the tragedy itself. This is a tragedy not just because of the precious loss of life or the actions of one person, but is also a tragedy that is caused by the criminalization and dehumanization of our own citizens. It is a tragedy not only for Michael Brown’s family but for the entire country.

Perhaps, it is more honest to for us to say, it is yet another tragedy that has become all too common for communities viewed as “other” to the American majority – young men of color, people with disabilities, lgbt individuals.

“They didn’t comply.” They were “bad kids.” “They were being belligerent.” “They looked suspicious.”

These statements that have no real discernable meaning often warrant a death sentence for the individuals upon which the observations are based.

Eric Garner, 43, who had asthma, was pulled to the sidewalk onto his chest and restrained in a chokehold by an officer. The medical examiner cited that Garner’s cause of death was “compression of neck (choke hold), compression of chest and prone positioning during physical restraint by police.” (New York)
Robert Ethan Saylor, 26, who had Down syndrome, went to see a movie and refused to leave. It was customary for Saylor to see a movie twice. Deputies put Saylor on the floor, held him down, and handcuffed him with such force that he suffered a fracture in his throat cartilage and died of asphyxiation. (Maryland)
Keith Vidal, 18, who had schizophrenia, was tasered, then shot, and killed when his family called law enforcement for help calming their son down. Vidal’s stepfather said, “”They killed my son in cold blood. We called for help, and they killed my son.” (North Carolina)
Gilberto Powell, 22, who has Down Syndrome, was beaten by police outside his home and was left with horrible bruises and scars on his face when law enforcement suspected he was carrying a weapon and tried to pat Powell down. Powell did not understand and ran. The suspicious bulge in his pants? It was a colostomy bag. (Florida)
Barry Montgomery, 29, who has schizophrenia, Tourette’s syndrome, and is non-verbal ,was harassed and then beaten and tasered for 25 minutes by sheriff officers when he was confronted about the smell of marijuana in his general area, and Montgomery did not respond. Montgomery sustained massive permanent injuries. (California)
Eric Garner, Ethan Saylor, Keith Vidal, Gilberto Powell, and Barry Montgomery – these are the names of a few people with disabilities who were brutally injured and killed because of who they are. There are many who were lost before them, and there are certainly others whose names we will never know because the brutality against them was never reported.

When a system that is designed to protect and serve is fueled by fear and anger, that is not merely a surmountable problem. It is a catastrophic failure of the system, and it demands transformation. Such a failure represents a lack of leadership, a corruption of institutions, and a distressing willingness to purposely and violently silence the voices of entire communities marked as different, non-compliant, and suspicious.

Perhaps what is most disconcerting however, is that the failure to support our young men of color, who are gay who have disabilities, who are poor, is not just to be laid at the feet of an intolerant police force, self-interested politicos or even a sensational hungry media. The fault lies in our own hearts.We have not taken enough of the responsibility to manage and maintain the values that we believe are right. We have been complacent in our engagement and been comfortable enough to declare that the problems are with other people. We have allowed ourselves to be separated into tiny groups of associated individuals rather than communities participating in a collective conversation about the state, direction and makeup of our society.

We have allowed problems of marginalization, exclusion, inaccessibility, dissemination, sexism and bigotry — problems that affect us all — to instead be addressed by a few, and have been content to say that it is a disability problem, or a race problem or gender problem or sexuality problem rather than admit that it is a problem for all of us. As members of a community that supports justice and inclusion we do not have the luxury to stand by when injustice is blatantly taking place in any form, and nor should we be satisfied to wait for other communities to ask for our help.

Civil rights, respect, and justice are due to all. We will not remain silent. The disability community, like the LGBT community, and so many others around the country, stands with the family of Michael Brown and with the people of Ferguson, Missouri. We call on the national and local media to be responsible and steadfast in their coverage of this story and others like it. We call on policy makers on all levels of American government not to shrink from action, and we are deeply grateful to Attorney General Eric Holder and the Department of Justice for their immediate commitment to a thorough investigation. Let us all come together, not only to rally and mourn but also to plan for action and collaboration.

Lastly, we specifically invoke the words of Justin Dart in “a call for solidarity among all who love justice, all who love life, to create a revolution that will empower every single human being to govern his or her life, to govern the society and to be fully productive of life quality for self and for all.”

THE LEAD ON NETWORK

If you are a disability organization and interested in signing on to this statement, please contact us at LeadOnUpdate@gmail.com. If you are an individual with a disability who cares about this issue and supports this statement please share it widely. Also, we know you have your own thoughts to express and urge you to do so in the comments. We will not remain silent! The events of the last week touch us all.

cerulean-warbler:

johnskylar:

lisa-maxwell:

kyrafic:

"Never did like that much," is a baller and superb way to express your irritation with the way the patriarchy refuses to acknowledge how badass you are.

Word.

Before World War I, she shot a cigarette out of the mouth of the Kaiser of Germany at his request.
After the war started she sent him a letter asking for another chance, as she was afraid her aim might’ve been a little off.

Annie Fucking Oakley everyone

cerulean-warbler:

johnskylar:

lisa-maxwell:

kyrafic:

"Never did like that much," is a baller and superb way to express your irritation with the way the patriarchy refuses to acknowledge how badass you are.

Word.

Before World War I, she shot a cigarette out of the mouth of the Kaiser of Germany at his request.

After the war started she sent him a letter asking for another chance, as she was afraid her aim might’ve been a little off.

Annie Fucking Oakley everyone

(Source: queenundomiel, via seananmcguire)

wilwheaton:

adventuresinblunderland:

schindermania:

dollymacabre:

funkvibe:

ok do you see this Legendary Epic woman right here? this is wendy fucking carlos and i’m going to describe to you why wendy carlos is 30 thousand times better than you
she is a 74 year old trans fucking woman. she remembers having dysphoria at age five and started hrt in 1968. you think transitioning is difficult now? try doing it in 1968. the thought scares the shit out of me.
her first album, switched on bach, is a literal hour of her playing bach’s music on synthesizers. that’s classical edm. edm wouldn’t exist if she hadn’t brought synthesizers to prominence. the catch? synthesizers in 1968 were monophonic. that means you can only play one note at a time. wendy carlos sat there and played each instrument’s piece of bachs music at least 6 times per symphony, painstakingly overdubbing and rerecording each line, one at a time.
oh yeah, switched on bach was the first classical album to sell more than 500k copies and she won 3 grammies and stayed on the billboard #1 pop charts for 17 weeks.
you know tron? that really awesome movie whose sequel daft punk made the ost for? wendy is the original daft punk. tron’s soundtrack was all her; not only that, but so was a clockwork orange and the shining. 
in 1998 this piece of shit momus (aka nick currie on wired) made a song mocking wendy’s sexual orientation. $50k of currie’ money later, she forced him to remove that song from his entire collection, have the master destroyed, and his music career fucking died after that.
figured i’d post this since daft punk keep getting a lot of love. i love daft punk, but they owe their lives to this fucking badass.

HOLY. CRAP. I did not know this.

work work work work work!

Wendy Carlos also scored Kubrick’s ‘Clockwork Orange’ and ‘The Shining.’ She’s a big deal, people.

Holy shit.

Wendy Carlos = Awesome

wilwheaton:

adventuresinblunderland:

schindermania:

dollymacabre:

funkvibe:

ok do you see this Legendary Epic woman right here? this is wendy fucking carlos and i’m going to describe to you why wendy carlos is 30 thousand times better than you

  1. she is a 74 year old trans fucking woman. she remembers having dysphoria at age five and started hrt in 1968. you think transitioning is difficult now? try doing it in 1968. the thought scares the shit out of me.
  2. her first album, switched on bach, is a literal hour of her playing bach’s music on synthesizers. that’s classical edm. edm wouldn’t exist if she hadn’t brought synthesizers to prominence. the catch? synthesizers in 1968 were monophonic. that means you can only play one note at a time. wendy carlos sat there and played each instrument’s piece of bachs music at least 6 times per symphony, painstakingly overdubbing and rerecording each line, one at a time.
  3. oh yeah, switched on bach was the first classical album to sell more than 500k copies and she won 3 grammies and stayed on the billboard #1 pop charts for 17 weeks.
  4. you know tron? that really awesome movie whose sequel daft punk made the ost for? wendy is the original daft punk. tron’s soundtrack was all her; not only that, but so was a clockwork orange and the shining. 
  5. in 1998 this piece of shit momus (aka nick currie on wired) made a song mocking wendy’s sexual orientation. $50k of currie’ money later, she forced him to remove that song from his entire collection, have the master destroyed, and his music career fucking died after that.

figured i’d post this since daft punk keep getting a lot of love. i love daft punk, but they owe their lives to this fucking badass.

HOLY. CRAP. I did not know this.

work work work work work!

Wendy Carlos also scored Kubrick’s ‘Clockwork Orange’ and ‘The Shining.’ She’s a big deal, people.

Holy shit.

Wendy Carlos = Awesome

nprradiopictures:

skunkbear:

So photographer David Slater wants Wikipedia to remove a monkey selfie that was taken with his camera. As you can see from this screen shot, Wikipedia says no: the monkey pressed the shutter so it owns the copyright.

We got NPR’s in-house legal counsel, Ashley Messenger, to weigh in. She said:

Traditional interpretation of copyright law is that the person who captured the image owns the copyright. That would be the monkey. The photographer’s best argument is that the monkey took the photo at his direction and therefore it’s work for hire. But that’s not a great argument because it’s not clear the monkey had the intent to work at the direction of the photographer nor is it clear there was “consideration” (value) exchanged for the work. So… It’s definitely an interesting question! Or the photographer could argue that leaving the camera to see what would happen is his work an therefore the monkey’s capture of the image was really the photographer’s art, but that would be a novel approach, to my knowledge.

Who ever thinks copyright law is boring is clearly wrong. -Emily

(via youneedacat)

princelesscomic:

nappynomad:

princelesscomic:

princelesscomic:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/787527503/illegal-by-jeremy-whitley-and-heather-nunnelly
In “Illegal” I wanted to take that same sort of story - a girl from Mexico who has an abusive father and no future worth speaking of makes a split second decision with her mother to leave it behind in favor of a chance to do or be something better.  But what I also wanted to do was bring in the current landscape of modern technology, government surveillance, and the increasingly ridiculous state of immigration reform in the US.
The thing that always bothers me about sci-fi stories is that we come in so late in the story.  We only really see and learn about the government corruption and abuse when it threatens the life of our well to do young white and male protagonist.  That’s not the beginning.  First they isolate the outsiders: the poor, the sick, the powerless, the minorities.  If the government is turning against the young strong white men, then a lot has already gone down.  Where are the stories of the sick who were experimented on?  Where are the stories of the minorities whose cries of racism were ignored?  Where are the stories of the ones who aren’t missed when the government turns on them, because the government convinced you that their very presence was illegal?
What resulted was “Illegal”, a story about Gianna Delrey - a young woman who is living outside the system and in constant danger of being arrested and detained just for daring to exist in America.  But the America she knows is one where the rich live high above the ground in rooftop villas and build themselves neighborhoods they never have to leave hundreds of feet in the air.  One where the poor and undocumented are forced to live off the scraps and face constant harassment from the authorities.
But in a world where every move of every citizen is tracked - from their location to their purchases to who they meet - being invisible can present an interesting opportunity in the right hands.  And when one of her upper class employers decides to turn on her, Gianna finds herself on the run and falling in with a group that deals in black market identities.  
I wanted to see the insane chases through the skyscrapers the make up the city.  I wanted to add elements of parkour and sci-fi action.  In a world that’s packed full of people stacked into massive buildings, it’s possible to have a foot chase hundreds of feet in the air.  Gianna will be jumping out of apartment skyscrapers and onto rooftop gardens with no net and no chance of rescue.  Gianna and her new friends will be using the skyscrapers under which they’ve been buried as their paths weapons and escape routes.
FROM HEATHER
When Jeremy pitched to me Illegal I was immediately grabbed by the concept, and the fact that GIanna was the female lead. For a while I had wanted to draw a comic with a woman main character, and I was glad that I was able to collaborate with Jeremy on the project. The script was very in depth and explored a lot of politics that we deal with today –racism, sexism, abuse, and the immigrant system. It was a very powerful piece that I think comic books fans today would thoroughly enjoy. Illegal is smart, daring, and different. It stood out to me, and I I am confident others will feel the same.


We’ve reached $2,500! Thanks so much! And if you haven’t had a chance to donate or share, please jump on!

Just donated at the TEAM JEREMY TIER!  Yay!

Woot!

princelesscomic:

nappynomad:

princelesscomic:

princelesscomic:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/787527503/illegal-by-jeremy-whitley-and-heather-nunnelly

In “Illegal” I wanted to take that same sort of story - a girl from Mexico who has an abusive father and no future worth speaking of makes a split second decision with her mother to leave it behind in favor of a chance to do or be something better.  But what I also wanted to do was bring in the current landscape of modern technology, government surveillance, and the increasingly ridiculous state of immigration reform in the US.

The thing that always bothers me about sci-fi stories is that we come in so late in the story.  We only really see and learn about the government corruption and abuse when it threatens the life of our well to do young white and male protagonist.  That’s not the beginning.  First they isolate the outsiders: the poor, the sick, the powerless, the minorities.  If the government is turning against the young strong white men, then a lot has already gone down.  Where are the stories of the sick who were experimented on?  Where are the stories of the minorities whose cries of racism were ignored?  Where are the stories of the ones who aren’t missed when the government turns on them, because the government convinced you that their very presence was illegal?

What resulted was “Illegal”, a story about Gianna Delrey - a young woman who is living outside the system and in constant danger of being arrested and detained just for daring to exist in America.  But the America she knows is one where the rich live high above the ground in rooftop villas and build themselves neighborhoods they never have to leave hundreds of feet in the air.  One where the poor and undocumented are forced to live off the scraps and face constant harassment from the authorities.

But in a world where every move of every citizen is tracked - from their location to their purchases to who they meet - being invisible can present an interesting opportunity in the right hands.  And when one of her upper class employers decides to turn on her, Gianna finds herself on the run and falling in with a group that deals in black market identities.  

I wanted to see the insane chases through the skyscrapers the make up the city.  I wanted to add elements of parkour and sci-fi action.  In a world that’s packed full of people stacked into massive buildings, it’s possible to have a foot chase hundreds of feet in the air.  Gianna will be jumping out of apartment skyscrapers and onto rooftop gardens with no net and no chance of rescue.  Gianna and her new friends will be using the skyscrapers under which they’ve been buried as their paths weapons and escape routes.

FROM HEATHER

When Jeremy pitched to me Illegal I was immediately grabbed by the concept, and the fact that GIanna was the female lead. For a while I had wanted to draw a comic with a woman main character, and I was glad that I was able to collaborate with Jeremy on the project. The script was very in depth and explored a lot of politics that we deal with today –racism, sexism, abuse, and the immigrant system. It was a very powerful piece that I think comic books fans today would thoroughly enjoy. Illegal is smart, daring, and different. It stood out to me, and I I am confident others will feel the same.

We’ve reached $2,500! Thanks so much! And if you haven’t had a chance to donate or share, please jump on!

Just donated at the TEAM JEREMY TIER! Yay!

Woot!

"

Just over a quarter (25.9 percent) of the 3,932 speaking characters evaluated were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.

A full 74.1 percent were white, 14.1 percent black, 4.9 percent Hispanic, 4.4 percent Asian, 1.1 percent Middle Eastern, 1 percent American Indian or Alaskan Native and 1.2 percent were from “other” races/ethnicities.

No meaningful change has been observed in the frequency of any racial/ethnic group on screen in 600 popular films between 2007 and 2013.

"

USC study released last week shows that nothing has changed between 2007 and 2013.  

Nearly 75% of speaking roles go to white actors.

(via racebending)

#Read More Arab Folktales

#Read More Arab Folktales #diversity #steampunk #writing

Yes. I  want YOU to read more Arab folktales. There’s been a lot of attention lately given to how #WeNeedDiverseBooks and increasing the number of diverse characters in film, and seeing more women directors etc. A strong subset of genre fiction, in particular fantasy and science fiction, is the retold fairytale or folktale.  I love these kinds of stories – Grimm, Anderson, Perrault and others.…

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